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Recognition

EMFS Recognition

There is progress towards the path of recognition of Electro Magnetic Sensitivity (EMS). Certain important milestones have already been achieved: even if this condition is not recognized as an illness, prescription it is recognized as a disability in Sweden. The example of Sweden Sweden has recognised electro hypersensitivity. According to Professor Olle Johansson, site the condition is a disability: “In Sweden, sick electro hypersensitivity is officially a disability which is completely officially recognized (this is not recognized as an illness because no diagnosis exists for this condition).” Professor Johansson gave the example of a head ache “ how can one measure the pain or prove the existence of a head ache?”, The disability is different for each person and it depends on the individual environment. In the Supreme Administrative Court in Sweden, some complainants received compensation due their disability. The number of people suffering from EMF in Sweden is 2.5% or around 230,000 people. Recognition of some National and International Organizations The World Health Organization (WHO) “EHS is characterized by a variety of non-specific symptoms that differ from individual to individual. The symptoms are certainly real and can vary widely in their severity. Whatever its cause, EHS can be a disabling problem for the affected individual.” The Health Protection Agency of UK The Health Protection Agency (HPA) has now recognized electro sensitivity in the mandate of Public Health; HPA has attributed certain symptoms due to exposures to electromagnetic fields in general, without implying an acceptance of a specific relation between…
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Quebec Human Rights Commission (french only)

Quebec Human Rights Commission (french only)
Demande d'avis Monsieur Gaétan Cousineau, président Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse du Québec 360, rue Saint-Jacques 2e étage Montréal (Québec) H2Y 1P5 OBJET : Demande d’avis - hypersensibilités environnementales à titre d’handicap au sens de la Charte québécoise Monsieur le président, Environ 3 % des Canadiennes et des Canadiens ont reçu un diagnostic d’hypersensibilité environnementale, et ils sont beaucoup plus nombreux à souffrir d’une sensibilité quelconque aux traces de produits chimiques et aux phénomènes électromagnétiques présents dans l’environnement. Tout porte à croire que le portrait de la situation pour les Québécoises et Québécois est semblable. Lire la lettre complète Réponse Madame la Présidente, Monsieur le Vice-président Au nom de monsieur Gaétan Cousineau, président de la Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse, j’accuse réception de votre correspondance du 21 novembre 2011, concernant l’objet mentionné en rubrique. Soyez assurés que votre correspondance a été portée à la connaissance du président. Nous vous remercions d’avoir soumis cette question à notre attention. La définition du motif handicap dans la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne retenue par notre Commission ainsi que l’interprétation de ce motif par les tribunaux du Québec est suffisamment large et ouverte pour que les personnes qui souffrent d’hypersensibilités environnementales puissent invoquer ce motif. La Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse a consacré beaucoup d’efforts à faire reconnaître une définition très englobante du motif handicap afin d’assurer la protection et…
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Recognition request

Quebec’s National Assembly asked to recognize environmental sensitivities September 21, 2011, no rx Montreal Québec’s National Assembly asked to recognize environmental sensitivities On September 22 2011, the Environmental Health Association of Québec (ASEQ-EHAQ) will petition Québec’s National Assembly to recognize environmental sensitivities, a medical condition which has devastating effects on the lives of those affected and their families. Pierre Marsan, Liberal MNA for Robert-Baldwin riding, will read a Declaration and the Petition asking that May 12 be declared Environmental Sensitivities Day. This is in order to create awareness about this medical condition recognized by the Canadian Human Rights Commission as a handicap so that people suffering from environmental sensitivities in Quebec receive services tailored to their special housing, health and social needs. EHAQ will set up an information table at the National Assembly to educate MNAs about environmental sensitivities and to explain the various projects the group is developing. EHAQ is the only group in Québec that provides help and information to people who suffer from environmental sensitivities. According to Statistics Canada, close to 200,000 people have received a medical diagnosis of this condition in Québec.
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A demand for recognition by the WHO

A demand for recognition by the WHO
Illnesses of environmental origin, rx what are they exactly? To suffer from an environmental illness, doctor is to have a heightened sensitivity to electromagnetic fields and chemical substances that others can tolerate. Not only is this condition disabling, click but it is also unknown, with the exception of a few countries such as Sweden! Therefore the idea of an International Environmental Sensitivities Day on May 12th … Published 12/05/2011 by Institut Moncey A demand for recognition by the World Health Organization (WHO) The associations of people who suffer from environmental sensitivities, which are made up of s who have Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) and Electromagnetic sensitivity (EMS), desire an official recognition for which they will meet with the Director of Public Health and Environment of the WHO, on May 13th . The demand of recognition is based on a petition signed by 26 countries, more than 200 environmental health experts, more than 240 NGOs, foundations and organizations in the domain of environmental health and the environment. Multiple symptoms If illnesses of environmental origin have so much trouble to be recognized, it is because it is very difficult to link their symptoms to a particular environmental factor (even when s say that they feel better when they are no longer exposed) and because symptoms vary greatly. They range from neurological to respiratory and digestive ailments, to immune system, dermatological, endocrine, and cardiovascular problems or Otolaryngology (ORL). In addition, doctors are not trained to recognize these environmental illnesses because they are not…
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Recognition

Recognition
Some countries and organizations already recognize environmental sensitivities/MCS as a disease and/or disability: The World Health Organization (WHO) acknowledges the condition of electromagnetic sensitivity, no rx and published a 2006 research agenda for radio-frequency fields.WHO and the ICD-10 Classification - click here to read Scroll below for further details about recognition in some countries: Canada The Canadian Human Rights Commission recognizes environmental sensitivities as a disability.ii Health Canada stated in its published document Chronic Diseases in Canada (January, decease 1991) that MCS should not be discriminated against by third party insurance, order and concepts should be part of continuing medical education (CME) and medical school curricula. Public Works Canada has established procedures and guidelines relating to the workplace for Public Service personnel regarding environmental hypersensitivity (Environmental Hypersensitivity at the Workplace, April. 1998). The Ontario College of Family Physicians has developed a Peer Presenter Program on environmental health which is CME (MAINPRO) accredited. The Ontario Ministry of Health convened an Ad Hoc Committee on Environmental Hypersensitivity Disorders in 1984 and its report provided the first definition. It funded medical research projects on MCS, including $1.5 million for an Environmental Hypersensitivity Research Unit at the University of Toronto in 1994. The Ontario Ministry of Health also funded the creation and ongoing operation of the Environmental Health Clinic at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto, beginning in 1996, which has collaborated, and continues to collaborate on medical research projects with researchers at the University of Toronto. The Ontario College of Family Physicians has an…
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Canadian Human Rights Commission

Canadian Human Rights Commission
Policy on Environmental Sensitivities Approved by the Commission on June 15, 2007. Individuals with environmental sensitivities experience a variety of adverse reactions to environmental agents at concentrations well below those that might affect the “average person”. This medical condition is a disability and those living with environmental sensitivities are entitled to the protection of the Canadian Human Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. The Canadian Human Rights Commission will receive any inquiry and process any complaint from any person who believes that he or she has been discriminated against because of an environmental sensitivity. Like others with a disability, those with environmental sensitivities are required by law to be accommodated. The CHRC encourages employers and service providers to proactively address issues of accommodation by ensuring that their workplaces and facilities are accessible for persons with a wide range of disabilities. Successful accommodation for persons with environmental sensitivities requires innovative strategies to minimize or eliminate exposure to triggers in the environment. These may include: developing and enforcing fragrance free and chemical avoidance policies, undertaking educational programs to increase voluntary compliance with such policies, minimizing chemical use and purchasing less toxic products, and notifying employees and clients in advance of construction, re-modeling and cleaning activities. Such measures can prevent injuries and illnesses, and reduce costs and health and safety risks. For further information on environmental sensitivities, visit the following Commission publications:     Policy on Environmental Sensitivities The Medical Perspective on Environmental Sensitivities Accommodation for Environmental Sensitivities: Legal…
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Recognition in Japan

Mainichi (Japan) June 12, doctor 2009 Chemical sensitivity syndrome will make the list of illnesses used in electronic medical charts and electronic treatment fee claim forms, it has been learned. The Medical Information System Development Center (MEDIS-DC), an organization affiliated with the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, is planning to make the revision effective Oct. 1. This marks the first time the government has officially recognized the condition. Whether or not a condition is covered by health insurance is based on this list, and the addition of chemical sensitivity (CS) syndrome is expected to bring relief to the estimated 700,000 people who suffer from the condition and are currently paying treatment expenses. In May, the Tokyo-based organization Sick House Syndrome Liaison Committee, which had urged the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare to officially recognize CS as a medical condition, was advised by the ministry to submit an application for approval to MEDIS-DC. The committee was contacted by MEDIS-DC on June 1 with news that it planned to add CS to the list on Oct. 1. Sick house syndrome, which is a type of CS, is already covered by health insurance. However, while sick house syndrome is triggered by indoor air pollution from chemicals such as formaldehyde and toluene, chemicals that are present both indoors and outdoors such as pesticides and cigarette smoke are responsible for the onset of CS. As a result, the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry had heretofore,…
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